Shakespearean tragedy

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2017년 2월 24일

Tragedy is the designation given to most tragedies written by playwright William Shakespeare. Many of his history plays share the qualifiers of a Shakespearean tragedy, but because they are based on real figures throughout the History of England, they were classified as “histories” in the First Folio. The Roman tragedies—Julius Cæsar, Antony and Cleopatra and Coriolanus—are also based on historical figures, but because their source stories were foreign and ancient they are almost always classified as tragedies rather than histories. Shakespeare’s romances (tragicomic plays) were written late in his career and published originally as either tragedy or comedy. They share some elements of tragedy featuring a high status central character but end happily like Shakespearean comedies. Several hundred years after Shakespeare’s death, scholar F.S. Boas also coined a fifth category, the “problem play”, for plays that don’t fit neatly into a single classification because of their subject matter, setting, or ending.[1][2] The classifications of certain Shakespeare plays are still debated among scholars.

Contents

1 Chronology
2 Influences and sources
3 Contemporary tragedy
4 See also
5 Notes and references

5.1 Notes
5.2 References

6 Sources
7 External links

Chronology[edit]

Edwin Austin Abbey (1852–1911) King Lear, Cordelia’s Farewell

Below is the list of Shakespeare’s plays listed as tragedies in the First Folio, along with a date range in which each particular play is believed to have been written.[1][3]

Play
Terminus

post quem
ante quem

Titus Andronicus
1591
1593

Romeo and Juliet
1594
1595

Julius Caesar
1599
1600

Hamlet
1600
1601

Troilus and Cressida[a]
1601
1602

Othello
1604
1605

King Lear
1605
1606

Macbeth
1605
1606

Timon of Athens
1605
1608

Antony and Cleopatra
1606
1607

Coriolanus
1607
1608

The Tempest
1610
1611

Influences and sources[edit]
The English Renaissance, when Shakespeare was writing, was fueled by a renewed interest in Roman and Greek classics and neighboring renaissance literature written years earlier in Italy, France, and Spain.[1] Shakespeare wrote the majority of his tragedies under the rule of James I, and their darker contents may reflect the general mood of the country following the death of Elizabeth I, as well as James’ theatrical preferences.[1] Shakespeare, as was customary for other playwrights in his day, used history, other plays, and non-dramatic literature as sources for his plays
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